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Celebrity homes | Manolo for the Home
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The New Oval Office? I’m Neutral.

It’s a little boring, no? Rather hotel-ish. All that beige… *yawn*

And really, can we do away with the practice of covering the entire space with a giant oval area rug covered in eagles and patriotic phrases? Because the floor installed in the oval office in 2005 is just amazing. Imagine all that boring furniture sitting on that floor.

Wouldn’t that be a lot more stylin’?

Buy It: Steven Cojocaru’s MCM

Have $3.95 million just sitting around burning a hole in your pocket? Love that classic old school modern look? Then have I got just the property for you. Fashion critic Steven Cojocaru’s mid-century modern home is apparently up for sale, though you can lease it at a mere $20k per month.

What does that buy you? 3,850 square feet, first of all, under high pitched-roof ceilings with sweet exposed wood. There’s plenty of glass to let the outside in, and gorgeous exposed brick in the living room. Then there are all the “little” details like an orb fireplace, amazing bath tubs, and the neutral decor that might surprise some at its understated tastefulness.

And how about that infinity edge pool, mmm. Those are so awesome when done right. I tell you truly that while I usually go in for a bit more color and a lot more black, I wouldn’t kick this particular real estate out of bed. How about you? Like it? Love it? Hate it? Why?

(via)

A Kitchen With Flow

julia-childs-kitchen

Love her or hate her, Julia Child exerted a great deal of influence over the evolution of American cooking — a book I love, Something From the Oven, touches briefly on just how much. But that sort of history is best left to authors of food tomes and cookery bloggers. What I’m interested in is her kitchen. Want to see it? There’s an amazing reproduction of Julia Child’s kitchen in an exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of American History. I’d post a picture here, but I’m unsure about the legality of doing so, which means you’ll have to be satisfied with the link above.

Isn’t that a beautiful kitchen? Julia Child’s kitchen was not particularly pretty in the sense that a staged kitchen in House Beautiful is pretty. Rather, it’s a lived in kitchen… a worked in kitchen… a kitchen that is beautiful in its perfect usefulness. The knives, the colanders, the parts for the KitchenAid are all accessible. I somehow imagine that I could walk right into Julia Child’s kitchen and start whipping something up without much trouble. I doubt anyone could say the same for my kitchen, since not much beyond my cast iron pan and my teapot is accessible without digging around in cabinets and drawers. Could someone say the same for your kitchen?