Pasha: Yet Another Polycarbonate Chair

I love ghost chairs. The originals, the knock offs, the rentals at events. Whatever. Clear chairs, basically plastic and line produced, very cool. Why? Because they look pretty damn sharp mixed in with regular decor. That’s modern or classic, whatever, as long as there is some color there. Should you go out and fill up your digs with polycarbonate chairs and plastic tables and so on? Nah. That’s the recipe for ending up looking like a specialty shop that’s trying to hard. But one or even two clear plastic chairs? Very cool.

Pasha in the wild

Pasha and a friend

Pasha at home

This particular polycarbonate chair is Pasha, designed by Marco Pocci and Claudio Dondoli for Pedrali, and it also comes in black and white for those who like the fantastic plastic but not so much the clear aesthetic as much as I do.

Slipcovers for the Knit Obsessed Among Us

I have five cats and one kid, which means slipcovers are non-negotiable in my household. However, I’ve been led to believe that some people slipcover for the fun of it, perhaps to refresh older furniture or to make decor updates on the cheap. For not exactly cheap, but possibly less than the cost of a new armchair, you can get a hand knit slipcover for your favorite armchair that will make it every bit as cozy as that old favorite sweater of yours that is now only appropriate for use inside the house.

Cozy. But a crumb magnet.

These hand knit slipcovers for armchairs and cushions and ottomans (and lamps) wouldn’t work for me, I’m afraid, since my slipcover use is intended to make my furniture less of a cat hair/stain magnet. But if you can’t get enough of all things knit and want to make your furniture more difficult to keep crumb free, then BiscuitScout‘s hand knit slipcovers may be just what you’re looking for.

While the whole look isn’t my cup of tea, I can certainly see the appeal. What do you think? Too gimmicky? Or who cares, so long as it’s comfy?

Prying Eyes Stay Out, Light Comes In

Creepy neighbors looking into your windows from their windows? It’s a problem faced mainly by city dwellers, though anyone with a home that’s close to the next house over may find themselves facing privacy issues when it comes to bathroom and bedroom windows. The first solution that comes to mind is probably a curtain or blinds, but how about adhesive window film? Possibly associated with grandma’s house and restaurant bathrooms – at least in my mind – adhesive window film is nonetheless extremely useful when it comes to maintaining one’s privacy without also blocking out the sun.

And when it’s Emma Jeffs window film you’re using, you can choose between a whole bunch of really cool, pretty patterns that very specifically don’t look like the window film at grandma’s. I’m talking about everything from traditional geometric patterns to florals to unexpected stuff like rocket ships and fish.

This is just a sample - there are tons more patterns in the line

Perfect forthe potty, of course.

But also lovely in the kitchen and anywhere else privacy is required.

Each 37″ x 52″ roll of Emma Jeffs adhesive window film costs about $80 (a little steep, sure) and can be found at DesignPublic.com and 2Jane.com.

The Essence of Nature/Art/Furniture/Etc. from the Heads at Pulpo

There’s no winning in the game of blogging home decor and accessories and design because you can’t please all of the people all of the time. That’s cool; it’s all part of the fun. I know that utramod isn’t everyone’s cup of tea – when I’ve gone through my mod phases, I’ve gotten complaints – but I have to show off some of the sweet gear from Germany’s Pulpo. The brand, if that’s what you’d call it, works in cooperation with some absolutely fabulous designers to release furniture, lighting, and accessories that explore the essence of the things we find in our homes.

This table, it is the bomb?

A classic clock, pared down some. Or a lot.

Simply natural tea towel hangers, or nature made better.

Don't toss that box!

The essence of lamp?

A pair of antlers I can actually get behind.

I love them all – even the box table, which I think may be the most controversial product in the lineup. And even though nothing from Pulpo comes cheap. What do you think? Could you find a place for a little ultramod in your own home, even if you’re more of a traditionalist?

For the First Time Ever, Loving the Mess!

Hate to see a messy table? You just might like this one. AZE Design‘s “MESSY” project brings back the idea of really spending time at the table as a social event. For many of us, meals are taken on the go, alone or in the car – the Messy tablecloth wants to remind us that a meal is an opportunity to spend time together. For breakfast or for dinner, MESSY is a reminder that meals are best shared, even if that means things get a bit messy in the process.

Finally, a spill I don't have to worry about

Messy breaky, yum

AZE Design is a polish design studio established in 2006 by Anna Kotowicz and Artur Puszkarewicz, with a focus on combining traditional handicraft techniques – hello, embroidery! – with contemporary materials and processes. Kotowicz and Puszkarewicz practice what they call MINDMADE design, which aims to transform everyday situations into usable art. In this case, I’d say they’ve succeeded beautifully!

DIY Decorating You Can Actually Do (and Be Proud Of)

I’m a big fan of DIY decorating – mainly because I’m not exactly loaded in the money department. Would I hire someone else to handle all the finer details of my house if could afford it? Absolument! As it stands, though, if I want something, I can either keep wanting it or figure out how to make a reasonable approximation of that something in my extremely limited amount of free time. The good news? Once you start on the DIY decorating path, you learn some skills and the whole DIY thing gets easier. The bad news? Getting started isn’t always easy, especially if you’re stepping out onto the path with zero experience.

And that’s where tutorials fit in. Of course, if you (like me) scour blogs for DIY decorating tips, then you know that what’s out there ranges from uber fabulous to weirdly wtf. Books tend to be one step up from blogs in the DIY decorating department, if only because there are editors busting out the quality control on the step-by-step so you don’t get to Step 5 and start scratching your head.

Right now, when it comes to DIY decorating, I am digging on Crafting a Meaningful Home: 27 DIY Projects to Tell Stories, Hold Memories, and Celebrate Family Heritage.

If you can follow directions, you can prettify your home. True story.

Crafting a Meaningful Home contains 27 projects designed to tell your personal story or to share your cultural heritage (all of which can be done on a budget by the novice DIYer). All of the projects come from well-known designers, so you know you won’t just be slapping craft paper on tissue boxes when you decide to buy this book.

Of course, necessity isn’t the only reason to engage in DIY decorating and to turn what we already have into something more beautiful. Elise Boulding said: Frugality is one of the most beautiful and joyful words in the English language, and yet one that we are culturally cut off from understanding and enjoying. The consumption society has made us feel that happiness lies in having things, and has failed to teach us the happiness of not having things. In this case, new and mass produced things.

P.S. – I also like this book and this book… what are some of YOUR favorite DIY guides, online or off?

Inspiration: A Splash of Pink

Too much pink, and a room can end up looking like my daughter’s room. Which is great when you’re 2 – we get a lot of compliments, actually – but possibly not so good when you’re 32. Decorating with pink? Proceed with caution. Maybe think in terms of splashes of pink instead of huge swathes of the stuff. Kind of like this:

Pink door by Alain Briot

An arrangement of pink blossoms

Continue Reading…

The Classic Greyhound Statue: Yes or No?

Upon first glance, white ceramic greyhound statues seem like something you’d find in a new Long Island residence with Italinate features, lots of pink pastels inside, and a huge fountain set in an inappropriately small lawn outside. What can I say? I grew up on Long Island and saw a lot of places like that, and the older I became, the less I liked them.

While I haven’t changed my mind about the giant lawn fountains or the raging palette of pastels, I think I’m changing my mind about the white porcelain greyhound sculptures. I’m not saying a greyhound statue is something that would find a forever home in my little house, but I could see one serving as a foil for other types of decor for a while. And white is still white hot, as is shiny white ceramics. Even ceramic animals!

So enter the greyhound statue!

Greyhound in repose

Greyhounds upright

Or a greyhound in a collar?

I say that while I like ceramic greyhound sculptures, I’ll add that they’re not for every person or every decor. In my own little house, I think they’d come off as kind of ironic, and a nod to a weird past. What say you: Regal, or ridiculous?

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